Who Am I?: Part 7

Part 7 Text

“I am unstoppable, independent, strong willed, level headed, sensitive, caring, kind, and intelligent. I am someone who does not let fear deter me from my goals. I am driven and hardworking. I am constantly looking to improve myself and grow. I constantly look for a challenge. I am proud to say that I am fearless, revolutionary, and every changing. At the moment I am a different person that who I might be in the future and I am comfortable with that. I am not my weaknesses; I am a product of my resilience to overcome it.”


This post is part of an outgoing “Who Am I?” series, in which the MCDA ambassadors have shared their personal stories in a written activity. These posts will remain anonymous.

Who Am I?: Part 6

Part 6 Text

“I am an open-minded, goal oriented, social justice driven young man. As a product of diverse households, I value different backgrounds and identities as different but no less important than my own. I try to keep this in mind with everything that I do, whether it’s having a conversation or maintaining a friendship. I am not perfect. I’m far from it. But I strive to listen and better myself everyday so that I can live and enjoy my life while ensuring that others can as well.”


This post is part of an outgoing “Who Am I?” series, in which the MCDA ambassadors have shared their personal stories in a written activity. These posts will remain anonymous.

Who Am I?: Part 5

Part 5 Text

“A human being labeled by facts and stats. A 20 year old trying to discover more about myself. A wandering soul. A daughter, a student, a sister, a friend, and a lover. A person who cares about her culture and roots. A being who promotes social justice because she can’t understand why her brothers and sisters argue about race, color, and gender identity when we can not see that we are all connected. Who am I? I am earth, wind, air, fire, and water – all the elements surround me because I am connected as it’s connected to me. I am life.”


This post is part of an outgoing “Who Am I?” series, in which the MCDA ambassadors have shared their personal stories in a written activity. These posts will remain anonymous.

Who Am I?: Part 4

Part 4 Text

“I’m someone who thinks more than he acts. I think of everything I need to do and I get lost in the sea of due dates and time constraints. I like to just sit and work when I want to focus and time can slip by me, but if I lack motivation or direction, I flounder around. More often than not I do the latter but I’m forced to do the former because of time constraints.

I lack the capabilities to socialize, but I understand empathy and how to use it. When I’m forced to engage in small talk to build base ground, I feel uncomfortable, but I like to engage in meaningful conversation instead. I like to analyze over synthesize. I like to create by taking things apart. When I work creatively, I like to work independently and I set higher expectations for myself than I do when I work in groups.”


This post is part of an outgoing “Who Am I?” series, in which the MCDA ambassadors have shared their personal stories in a written activity. These posts will remain anonymous.

Who Am I?: Part 3

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“I am a human being who cares deeply about the health of this planet and all the species of plants and animals who live here. I am a person seeking peace within the world and within myself. I love being outside, laying in the sun, and living an active lifestyle. I could not live without art and literature. I love fresh fruits and vegetables. One of my goals in life is to manage a homestead off the grid, live independently of urban conveniences, and grow my own food to support myself. I hope to learn more about myself and be able to one day coherently share my story with others through a creative outlet, such as writing. I hope to inspire others through my work and passions.

I am enough.”


This post is part of an outgoing “Who Am I?” series, in which the MCDA ambassadors have shared their personal stories in a written activity. These posts will remain anonymous.

#SilencedNotSilent – Appropriation

Nashrah SilencedNotSilentEvery year since I was a young child, my family, friends and I paint our hands with henna and wear our traditional Pakistani clothing to celebrate our major Muslim holidays. When I was in fourth grade, I went to a public school where I was the only Asian girl. The one and only time I went to school with henna on my hands, all of my classmates made fun of me. They kept asking why I was drawing on myself with markers, what disease I have, and if it’ll rub off on them if I touch them. After that awful experience, I hid my culture. I separated my Pakistani identity from who I was when I was at school. I was silenced by the judgment and the misunderstanding of my peers. Now, when I see people of other cultures, especially the kids who made fun of me in elementary school, wearing henna and trying to participate in my culture without being invited, it still stings. As an Asian Pacific Islander American Affairs ambassador, I have learned how to embrace my culture and I have found my voice. I am no longer silenced by the judgment of others. Because of this, I hope to empower those who have had experiences that are similar to mine, so they can also connect with their cultures and tell their stories.  – Ambassador Nashrah Ahmed

Check out this link to learn more about cultural appropriation and its adverse effects.

#SilencedNotSilent


APIA Affairs @ UF is launching the #SilencedNotSilent campaign to challenge the notion that the Asian Pacific Islander American community is silent and invisible. Check out the campaign page here.

Who Am I?: Part 2

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“I am a 20 year old queer latino man. The son of two migrant Peruvians in search of more opportunities. One of three boys born into that family, and the first to move out of the house. I am a challenger. Trying to challenge systems of oppression that for so long were used to marginalize people. I am a voice that will not back down nor allow myself to be policed. I am an academic, I have been able to experience knowledge that inspires me, and translate it into actions.”


This post is part of an outgoing “Who Am I?” series, in which the MCDA ambassadors have shared their personal stories in a written activity. These posts will remain anonymous.

Who Am I?: Part 1

Part 1 Text

“Adopted, hispanic, raised by white people, equally introverted and extroverted, needs community but hates groups, needs spirituality but is not religious.

Sun in Leo, moon in Gemini, Aries rising in the third decan.    

Queer and part of that community.

Comic book nerd, interested in ongoing mythos of most kinds.             

Open-minded, selfish, vain, needy, but can listen.      

Interested in the material world and money.                                                    

Nihilist.                                                                                                                 

Economically and socially liberal, while still supporting capitalism.                            

Proud, stubborn, will attach meaning to anything and will follow actions to extreme just because she said she would.                                                                                      

Lazy, Liar.

Compulsive gambler.

Myself.”


This post is part of an outgoing “Who Am I?” series, in which the MCDA ambassadors have shared their personal stories in a written activity. These posts will remain anonymous.

Hispanic Heritage Month: A Celebration

Meet Susel Ramos. She is a fourth year UF student, studying International Studies and French. Susel Susel Ramosmoved to the United States from Cuba when she was younger, and almost immediately felt that she was a victim to prejudice. She recalls an instance when she was mistreated, even at the young age of six or seven, because she had to translate for her parents at a bank. The bank teller did not want to burden themselves with communicating with Susel and her parents, and instead gave them sub-par service. This event, along with harsh phrases like “You’re not supposed to be here” and “Go back to your own country” made Susel feel ashamed of her identity. At six years old.

Now, as a UF student, Susel has found her voice. She has something to stand for.

Susel has channeled her passion into becoming the Executive Director of UF’s Hispanic Heritage Month (HHM) celebration.

She says, “HHM is not just a month where our community can congregate together to reflect and cherish our hardships and success, but a month where others can also partake in the celebration and learn more about our people. It provides the outlet for Hispanics/Latinxs at UF to prove we are a force to be reckoned with while helping break the stereotypes of how we are portrayed. It helps us set our own standard of excellence and unite our voices and shout together. HHM shouldn’t just last one month. This is a lifetime commitment you make to yourself and your community around you.”

Be sure to take advantage of all that HHM has to offer until October 15, including free food and the opportunity to acquire new knowledge about your own identity.


You can stay up to date with HHM activities by following @UF_HHM on Instagram, Twitter, and Snapchat, as well as liking the Facebook page. A calendar of events can be found here.

From Nicholas Carre

We often forget how race is unconsciously embedded in our responses. Why do we suppose that the cop is the one being threatened? What justification is there for things to have go so far? The rationalization here is denies the fact that people have stereotypical views of African American/Black communities and that the cop is always in the right.

Nicholas Carre​, an MCDA ambassador from the Institute of Black Culture, responds to the following questions:

1. If someone used minimization as an excuse, how would YOU respond?

2. What is your reflection regarding the process?